Peripheral neuropathy/ischaemia

Back to Resources

Peripheral neuropathy/ischaemia

Prepheral ischaemia is condition where blood supply to the legs and feet is reduced due to narrowing of the arteries, which deprives the legs and feet of oxygen and nutrients. This narrowing may be caused by atherosclerosis (build-up of fatty areas inside arteries). Factors that increase the risk of developing peripheral ischaemia include smoking, high blood cholesterol, a high-fat diet and persistently raised blood glucose levels.Peripheral ischaemia symptoms include cramps, cold skin, and wounds that don’t heal properly. As the symptoms usually develop over months or years and you may not even notice any changes, you must have your feet examined by a health professional at least once a year.In peripheral neuropathy, nerves supplying your extremities (the ends of your limbs) are damaged due to repeated periods of high blood glucose, as well as high blood pressure. The damage occurs over months or years. It most commonly affects the feet, as they are supplied by the longest nerves and they bear your body weight.Symptoms for Peripheral Neuropathy-Tingling, burning, or prickling sensation (e.g. pins and needles sensation)-Extreme sensitivity to touch, even very light touch-Numbness or insensitivity to temperature or pain-Short, stabbing, or burning pain, which may be severe and often occurs at nightSymptoms of Peripheral ischaemia-Wounds or injuries that are slow to heal-Cramp-like pain in your calves after exertion or, less commonly,when you are resting-Persistent foot ulcers-cold pale feetPrevention, treatment, and outlookYou can help to prevent peripheral ischaemia/Neuropathy by eating healthily; not smoking; regular physical activity; taking your medication as recommended; and careful blood glucose management. Untreated, peripheral neuropathy or ischaemia can lead to potentially serious complications, including Charcot foot, ulcers, and possibly loss of the blood supply, which may result in gangrene or eventually amputation.ASSESSING YOUR RISK OF FOOT ULCERSYou are likely to develop foot ulcers if:1. Your blood glucose level has been above 10 mmol/L for long periods of time.2. Your blood pressure is over 140/80 and is not properly treated with medication.3. You have pins and needles or a burning sensation in your feet, or the skin there is acutely sensitive.4. You smoke.5. You have had foot ulcers before.6. You have poor circulation in your legs.7. You have reduced sensation in parts of your feet.If you have a foot ulcer, your health professional will clean out the infected tissue then dress the wound to prevent further infection. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms make a point to see your Doctor for consultation on how you will manage and reverse the nerve damage. You can book a session with Dr. Salwa at Kenya Diabetes Management Center and Pharmacy2,514People Reached100EngagementsBoost Unavailable

13137 Comments5 SharesLikeCommentShare

LEAVE A COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *




Enter Captcha Here :

Back to Resources